How Does an Airbag Restrain?

In moderate to severe frontal or near frontal collisions, even belted occupants can contact the steering wheel or the instrument panel. In moderate to severe side collisions, even belted occupants can contact the inside of the vehicle.

Airbags supplement the protection provided by safety belts by distributing the force of the impact more evenly over the occupant's body.

Rollover capable roof-rail airbags are designed to help contain the head and chest of occupants in the outboard seating positions in the first and second rows. The rollover capable roof-rail airbags are designed to help reduce the risk of full or partial ejection in rollover events, although no system can prevent all such ejections.

But airbags would not help in many types of collisions, primarily because the occupant's motion is not toward those airbags. See When Should an Airbag Inflate?  for more information.

Airbags should never be regarded as anything more than a supplement to safety belts.

    See also:

    Object Detection System Messages
    PARK ASSIST OFF This message displays when the park assist system has been turned off or when there is a temporary condition causing the system to be disabled. See Ultrasonic Parking Assist ...

    Contacting Roadside Assistance
    Roadside Assistance services are of no cost to you and available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Costs are only incurred in situations that exceed the limits of the program, some of which ar ...

    Securing a Child Restraint in the Center Front Seat Position
    WARNING: A child in a child restraint in the center front seat can be badly injured or killed by the frontal airbags if they inflate. Never secure a child restraint in the center front seat. It ...